Different Types of Commercial Transportation Insurance

Commercial transportation insurance is an absolutely huge field. It actually incorporates many different types of businesses, industry classifications, and even types of vehicles, than most people originally imagine. Here, you’ll find a quick overview of some of the key different forms of commercial auto insurance and how it impacts you.

Why is it so important? Well, consider that different vehicles present different risks, which translates to different insurance requirements, and also varying costs. The same applies for different industries and classifications.

The first way to consider commercial transport is by the different forms of coverage which may apply. This includes standard auto insurance policies, and general liability coverage.

Other types of commercial transport insurance coverage though include non-trucking liability, property or physical damage insurance, workers comp insurance, pollution coverage, inland marine insurance, equipment breakdown, property, trailer interchange, and so forth.

The next thing to keep in mind is that different types of trucks or vehicles, and different industries, may also have very specific types of commercial transportation policies written for them. Here, consider the varied needs of perhaps a refrigerated 18 wheeler truck versus a waste hauler, or a log hauler versus a tow truck, a household moving truck versus a construction or contracting van or pickup.

Taxi drivers, as well as charter buses and vans, even ice cream trucks and food trucks, need commercial auto insurance. A few other common vehicle and business types to consider include non emergency medical transportation, limousines, dump trucks, catering trucks, flatbeds, hearses, pump trucks, cement trucks,garage trucks, and on down the line from there. all of these different vehicles and industries have different commercial transport risks, and therefore different policies and forms of coverage.

Still, that’s just the beginning. Even if you have regular cars for your workplace, perhaps driving clients around or making deliveries, you need commercial policies for those vehicles.

Beyond that, all forms of commercial transport and vehicles should be protected by the right insurance policies. That includes trains, for instance, with railroad liability coverage, along with ships and planes, and all manners of water and aircraft.

Of course, if you think that you and your business may need commercial transportation insurance, or that you could use a better policy or a better price, then be sure to consult with a professional who has experience in your local area. Policies are different from state to state, so work with an insurance broker or consultant who knows your industry and your locale.

5 Types of Business Insurance and Why You Need Them

No matter the size or nature of your business, one thing that remains the same is the need for business insurance. There are many different aspects of your business that you’ll want to take into consideration when looking for new business insurance – or reviewing your current insurance coverage. Since every business is different, each one will have different insurance requirements. For example, a company that produces physical goods may need different insurance than a company which offers services. In either scenario, there are some similarities, and listed here are a few types of insurance that all businesses should consider.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance – for your employees

Workers’ Comp insurance is required by law in almost every state. It can provide coverage for medical costs and a portion of lost wages for an employee who becomes injured or ill on the job. Typically, this type of insurance only covers injuries or illness that occur on the job site – for example, if an employee slips and falls on a wet floor.

Since the laws regarding Workers’ Comp can be different depending on where your company is located, it’s important to work with an insurance professional to make sure you’re getting the coverage that’s required, as well as what you need for your particular business.

General Liability Insurance

General Liability Insurance is designed to protect you and your business from a variety of claims, including accidents, injuries, or claims of negligence. This type of insurance can help pay for things like property damage, medical expenses, libel, slander, legal costs, and faulty products. No one expects to get sued, but the reality is that it’s always a possibility. You don’t want to leave your business open to these types of situations, and the broader the protection, the better.

Professional Liability Insurance – “Errors and Omissions” coverage

Professional Liability Insurance can also be known as “Errors and Omissions Insurance,” or “Malpractice Insurance.” It protects you from lawsuits that allege negligence in providing professional services, providing shoddy work, or making mistakes or omissions. This type of insurance is particularly important if you have a service-based business, but can also be necessary for other types of businesses as well. Mistakes happen – so adequate Professional Liability Insurance can be helpful, even if you don’t think you’ll need it.

Property Insurance

The definition of “property” is broad, and can mean different things to different types of businesses. That’s why it’s important to make sure you carry adequate Commercial Property Insurance. Without this type of insurance, most small businesses wouldn’t be able to replace their equipment should something happen to cause damage or destruction. Property covered by this type of insurance can include buildings, computers, inventory, supplies and equipment. There are two types of Property Insurance: “all-risk” policies cover just about everything, and is a good way to avoid duplication or overlap of coverage, as well as gaps in trying to cover your liabilities. “Peril-specific” policies, or “named-peril” coverage applies only to particular perils that are specifically named in the policy. They’re usually needed when there is a high risk in a very particular area.

Life Insurance / Key Executive Insurance – protection and benefit

Offering life insurance for employees can be a valuable benefit when trying to attract high-quality employees. A business can even offer additional coverage for executives. These employees are deemed to be crucial to the running and success of the business, and may sometimes require additional insurance, above and beyond what the normal employee benefits provide. This can be another benefit in attracting top talent.

A business can also offer special “Key Person” policies for employees without whom the business could not function. Key Person Insurance protects against a key employee’s unexpected death – often times the benefit amount equals the expected revenue loss and costs required to find and train a suitable replacement. The business pays the premiums, and the insurance is considered a business asset.

It’s possible to combine some of these basic coverages as a package policy, often referred to as a Business Owner’s Policy, or BOP. Many insurance companies bundle certain coverages, and this can save you money, as long as you make sure you get the proper type of coverage.

Even if you feel you have adequate business insurance coverage that meets all your current needs, it’s still advisable to review all your coverage on an annual basis, to make sure that your coverage continues to provide everything that you need. This is particularly important if you or your business have experienced any major changes, such as change in family status, or a significant increase or decrease in business activity. Additionally, be sure to work with a reputable, licensed insurance agent or broker, who has knowledge regarding business like yours.

What Types of Insurance Coverage for the Ice Cream Truck Business?

Ah, the wonderful sounds of summer: the joyful chirping of birds, the slap of the seashore, the laughter of children frolicking outdoors – and the chiming tunes notifying neighborhood kids of all ages that the ice cream truck has arrived.

Ironically, that happy sound of music announcing the ice cream truck brings untold sadness to some. For the mothers, fathers and siblings of those kids killed in a related accident, the sound will never be reconciled with.

Although accidents can occur and associated insurance coverage can come with financial shielding, the dangers associated with this type of mobile frozen confection store and excited children looking forward to a favorite treat need careful consideration. There are things that parents, caregivers and ice cream truck operators can do to mitigate the risks of fatalities and serious injury. These include installing more mirrors on the vehicle and a safety bar to block children from getting in the blind spot’s way, as well as other safety mechanisms.

As far as the insurance companies are concerned, any equipment installed to prevent accidents may result in some form of discount on a commercial auto premium. It can also make rates lower on an already-discounted insurance package that combines commercial auto insurance with a business owners policy.

For reading convenience, we’ve listed the various forms of coverage related to this business below.

Special Commercial Auto Insurance for the Ice Cream Truck Business

• Commercial Auto Liability Coverage

Every US state requires commercial auto liability coverage to protect businesses from bodily injury liability when an accident occurs. This coverage also protects from property damage liability when the other car is damaged or when buildings or other property is damaged.

• Collision Coverage

If the driver of an ice cream truck caused an accident resulting in damage to his or her own truck, this insurance will help with the costs of repair or the costs to replace the truck if repair work is not an option.

• Medical Payments Coverage

This insurance will help pay for medical costs if the truck driver or passenger is hurt in accident.

• Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage

Uninsured or Underinsured Motorist coverage can help pay for damages incurred to the truck by another driver if he or she is either uninsured or underinsured and cannot fit the repair or replacement bill entirely.

For further information on insurance – commercial auto or business – speak to a professional independent agency that has its customers’ interests at the forefront.